African Language Courses


ELEMENTARY LEVEL

 

013:140: ELEMENTARY ARABIC I (Fall)

An introduction to Modern Standard Arabic and its script: Using a communicatively oriented, proficiency based approach students will develop basic communicative skills in the language through a combination of interactive classroom activities, take-home assignments and group work. Emphasis will be on the development of all language skills, including writing, reading comprehension and audio oral skills. In addition to the acquisition of a core vocabulary, the student will be prepared to manipulate basic grammatical structures of Arabic for purposes of basic communication in a variety of situations. Students will also be introduced to aspects of Arab culture to build cultural awareness and communicative competence.

 

013:141: ELEMENTARY ARABIC II (Spring)

This course is the second part of an introduction to Modern Standard Arabic: students will continue in this course to develop basic communicative skills in the language, by using a communicative and proficiency-based approach and by means of a combination of interactive classroom activities, take-home assignments and group work used in the past course. Emphasis will continue to be put equally on all language skills, including:  writing, reading, comprehension, and oral skills. The core vocabulary acquired in Elementary 1 will be expanded to cover a larger variety of everyday topics and situations. The course will also elaborate more on previously acquired basic language structures and students will be introduced to more aspects of the Arabic culture in order to continue building a better cultural awareness and a more solid communicative competence.

 

 

013:150: ELEMENTARY HAUSA I  

An introduction to Standard Hausa: Using a communicatively oriented, proficiency based approach students will develop basic communicative skills in the language through a combination of interactive classroom activities, take-home assignments and group work. Emphasis will be on the development of all language skills, including writing, reading comprehension and audio oral skills. In addition to the acquisition of a core vocabulary, the student will be prepared to manipulate basic grammatical structures of Hausa for purposes of basic communication in a variety of situations. Students will also be introduced to aspects of Hausa culture to build cultural awareness and communicative competence.

 

 

 

013:151: ELEMENTARY HAUSA II

This course is the second part of an introduction to Hausa: students will continue in this course to develop basic communicative skills in the language, by using a communicative and proficiency-based approach and by means of a combination of interactive classroom activities, take-home assignments and group work used in the past course. Emphasis will continue to be put equally on all language skills, including:  writing, reading, comprehension, and oral skills. The core vocabulary acquired in Elementary Hausa I will be expanded to cover a larger variety of everyday topics and situations. The course will also elaborate more on previously acquired basic language structures and students will be introduced to more aspects of the Hausa culture in order to continue building a better cultural awareness and a more solid communicative competence.

 

 

013:186: ELEMENTARY SWAHILI I (Fall)

 

An introduction to Kiswahili, one of Africa's major lingua franca spoken by millions across several nations in Eastern Africa. Using a communicatively-oriented, proficiency-based approach, students will develop basic communicative skills in the language through a combination of classroom activities, take-home and other language assignments. While the initial emphasis will be on the development of audio-oral skills, students will also be introduced to the essentials of reading comprehension and written expression. In addition to the acquisition of a core vocabulary, the student will be prepared to manipulate basic grammatical structures of Kiswahili for purposes of basic communication in a variety of situations. Students will also be introduced to aspects of Swahili and African culture to build cultural awareness and communicative competence.

 

 

 

013:187: ELEMENTARY SWAHILI II (Spring)

 

This is the second part of the introductory course to Kiswahili. Using a communicatively-oriented, proficiency-based approach, students will continue to develop basic communicative skills through a combination of classroom activities, take-home and other assignments. Emphasis will continue to be placed on the development of audio-oral skills, but students will also be required to undertake reading and comprehension exercises both within the classroom and as part of their take-home assignments. In addition to the acquisition of an expanded vocabulary, the student will be introduced to new grammatical structures of Kiswahili to enhance communication in a wider range of situations. Students will also be introduced to aspects of Swahili and African culture to build cultural awareness and communicative competence and will be required to carry our specific research projects on cultural topics.

 

 

013:192: ELEMENTARY TWI I (Fall)

 

An introductory course for non-Akan speakers. The course focuses on the basic structure and the culture of the Akan language and the people respectively. The course employs the communicative approach to language teaching. Culture will be taught in context.

 

 

 

013:193: ELEMENTARY TWI II (Spring)

 

This is a semester's language course for Twi beginner II students. The prerequisite is a semester's study of Twi in a regular academic session or a heritage or non-heritage learner who has exhibited proficiency above beginner (novice) low. The course focuses on the basic structure and the culture of the Akan language and the people respectively. The course employs the communicative approach to language teaching. Culture will be taught in context.

 

 

 

013:194: ELEMENTARY YORUBA I (Fall)

 

An introduction to modern Yoruba: Using a communicatively oriented, proficiency based approach students will develop basic communicative skills in the language through a combination of interactive classroom activities, take-home assignments and group work. Emphasis will be on the development of all language skills, including writing, reading comprehension and audio oral skills. In addition to the acquisition of a core vocabulary, the student will be prepared to manipulate basic grammatical structures of Yoruba for purposes of basic communication in a variety of situations. Students will also be introduced to aspects of Yoruba culture to build cultural awareness and communicative competence.

 

 

 

013:195: ELEMENTARY YORUBA II (Spring)

 

This course is the second part of an introduction to modern Yoruba: students will continue in this course to develop basic communicative skills in the language, by using a communicative and proficiency-based approach and by means of a combination of interactive classroom activities, take-home assignments and group work used in the past course. Emphasis will continue to be put equally on all language skills, including:  writing, reading, comprehension, and oral skills. The core vocabulary acquired in Elementary 1 will be expanded to cover a larger variety of everyday topics and situations. The course will also elaborate more on previously acquired basic language structures and students will be introduced to more aspects of the Yoruba culture in order to continue building a better cultural awareness and a more solid communicative competence.

 

 

 

013:196: ELEMENTARY ZULU I

 

An introduction to modern Zulu: Using a communicatively oriented, proficiency based approach students will develop basic communicative skills in the language through a combination of  interactive classroom activities, take-home assignments and group work. Emphasis will be on the development of all language skills, including writing, reading comprehension and audio oral skills. In addition to the acquisition of a core vocabulary, the student will be prepared to manipulate basic grammatical structures of Zulu for purposes of basic communication in a variety of situations. Students will also be introduced to aspects of Zulu culture to build cultural awareness and communicative competence.

 

 

 

013:197: ELEMENTARY ZULU II

 

This course is the second part of an introduction to modern Zulu: students will continue in this course to develop basic communicative skills in the language, by using a communicative and proficiency-based approach and by means of a combination of interactive classroom activities, take-home assignments and group work used in the past course. Emphasis will continue to be put equally on all language skills, including:  writing, reading, comprehension, and oral skills. The core vocabulary acquired in Elementary 1 will be expanded to cover a larger variety of everyday topics and situations. The course will also elaborate more on previously acquired basic language structures and students will be introduced to more aspects of the Zulu culture in order to continue building a better cultural awareness and a more solid communicative competence.

 

INTERMEDIATE LEVEL

 

 

013:240: INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I (Fall) 

013:241: INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II (Spring) AHq

 

The course will help students move from Novice High to Intermediate Middle level.  Students will acquire more vocabulary and more knowledge of the fundamental grammatical and morphological structures in order for them to attain a higher level of comprehension and communication.

 

 

 

 

013:286: INTERMEDIATE SWAHILI I 

013:287: INTERMEDIATE SWAHILI II AHq

 

This course reviews and expands students' knowledge of fundamental structures from Elementary Swahili and appropriate cultural contexts of these structures in oral and written communication. More grammar and vocabulary in a culturally and socially appropriate context is developed. Speaking ability is expanded through oral exercises, individual reports, class discussions, and recordings. Writing and reading are expanded through compositions, written exercises, and independent reading projects with texts supplied by instructor.

 

 

 

013:292: INTERMEDIATE TWI I (Fall) 

013:293: INTERMEDIATE TWI II (Spring) AHq

This course is the middle level of twi as a foreign language. Basically, instruction at this level is done in the target language with few swtiches to the source language where students understanding is lacking. Students mastery of issues addressed at the elementary level is partly the key to unlock issues proposed to teach at this level. As a result, we will devote the first five weeks of classes to reviewing students' performence through various class activities. it also encourages students to expand their vocabulary inventory through reading, writing (of essays and different forms of dictation exercises), and discussion of given language the intermediate middle in performance (i.e., oral proficiency).

 

 

013:294: INTERMEDIATE YORUBA I (Fall) 

013:295: INTERMEDIATE YORUBA II (Spring) AHq

 

This course reviews and expands students' knowledge of fundamental structures from Elementary Yoruba and appropriate cultural contexts of these structures in oral and written communication. More grammar and vocabulary in a culturally and socially appropriate context is developed. Speaking ability is expanded through oral exercises, individual reports, class discussions, and recordings. Writing and reading are expanded through compositions, written exercises, and independent reading projects with texts supplied by instructor.

 

 

 

013:296-297: INTERMEDIATE ZULU I and II

 

This course reviews and expands students' knowledge of fundamental structures from Elementary Zulu and appropriate cultural contexts of these structures in oral and written communication. More grammar and vocabulary in a culturally and socially appropriate context is developed. Speaking ability is expanded through oral exercises, individual reports, class discussions, and recordings. Writing and reading are expanded through compositions, written exercises, and independent reading projects with texts supplied by instructor.

 

ADVANCED LEVEL

 

 

013:340: ADVANCED ARABIC I (Fall)

 

This course focuses on developing advanced oral and written fluency in modern Arabic through the study of cultures and histories of Arab-speaking nations. The course is taught in both Arabic and English, where emphasis is placed on broadening Arabic vocabulary and grammar; listening and speaking skills; and discerning the cultural context of complex readings and speech among the Arabic nations/regions. We will work closely with our primary textbook during the semester. In the second half of the semester we will also work with some outside texts, primarily short stories and essays.

 

 

 

013:341: ADVANCED ARABIC II (Spring)

 

This course is the second part of advanced Modern Standard Arabic. Through the combination of proficiency based interactive classroom activities, homework readings and assignments and group work used in Advanced Arabic I, you will continue in this course to consolidate your advanced level of fluency with continued equal emphasis on all language skills including reading, comprehension, writing and speaking. in order to bring you to a near-native competency in listening and reading comprehension, you will continue to be exposed to the authentic texts with  moderate complexity from the media and modern Arabic literature to complement the textbook material. Bi-weekly oral presentations, group discussion and writings dealing with the various topics that will be presented in class, will continue to help you not only in practicing old and newly acquired grammar and vocabulary items and consolidating your oral and writing skills, they will also continue to be an ultimate means to guide you to a deeper understanding and assimilation of more complex cultural features of the Arabic speaking region.

 

 

013:386-387: ADVANCED SWAHILI I & II

 

This is an advanced Kiswahili course which will engage learners in extended spoken and written discourse. Advanced learners of Kiswahili will listen to, read about, write and speak on authentic video materials, contemporary novels, and newspapers. They will also participate in various discussions on cultural and political issues.  

 

 

 

013:394-395: ADVANCED YORUBA I & II

 

This is an advanced Yoruba course which will engage learners in extended spoken and written discourse. Advanced learners of Yoruba will listen to, read about, write and speak on authentic video materials, contemporary novels, and newspapers. They will also participate in various discussions on cultural and political issues.

 

OTHER LANGUAGE COURSES

 

013:203: LANGUAGE & SOCIETY IN AFRICA, MIDDLE EAST AND SOUTH ASIA (Fall) AHo, AHq

 

Language and Society in AMESA is a complementary course to the AMESALL langugage courses, which aims to offer students some grounding on socio-linguistic and socio-cultural dimensions of AMESA langauges. At the 200 level, it will provide them the opportunity not only to learn AMESA languages but also to better understand the nature of these languages and their speakers in the AMESA societies 

 

 

 

013:403: TRANSLATION PRACTICUM I

This is a practical course in translation into English. Its primary focus is on how to translate. It is an exposition of different kinds of problems in the process of translation with plenty of  practice in developing a rationale for solving them. While theoretical issues are bound to arise throughout the semester, their discussion will be restricted to the practical aim of translation method and translation exercises. The course assumes the student already has a good command of the language (up to the advanced level) and is familiar with the proper use of dictionaries and, where appropriate, databases. Nonetheless, the analytical detail given to a wide range of texts in the course will definitely further the student's competence of the source language.

 

013:404: TRANSLATION PRACTICUM II

This is the second part of the translation practicum, a practical course in translation into English. It continues putting primary focus on how to translate, offering an exposition of different kinds of problems in the process of translation with plenty of practice in developing a rationale for solving them. While theoretical issues are bound to arise throughout the semester, their discussion will be restricted to the practical aim of translation method and translation exercises. The course assumes the student already has a good command of the language (up to the advanced level) and is familiar with the proper use of dictionaries and, where appropriate, databases. Nonetheless, the analytical detail given to a wide range of texts in the course will definitely further the student’s competence of the source language.

 

 

013:306: DOCUMENTING THE LANGUAGES OF NEW JERSEY

Discovery and documentation of the structure of an AMESA language spoken in New Jersey through consultation with native speakers. During the course of elicitation and discussion sessions, students will produce a lasting, multipurpose documentation of a language spoken in New Jersey. According to the latest statistics, roughly 140 languages are spoken in New Jersey, with more than two million residents speaking a language other than English at home. Languages of interest to students of Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia that are spoken in NJ include Gujarati, Arabic, Greek, Hindi, Urdu, Hebrew, Kru, Ibo, Yoruba, Bengali, Turkish, Yiddish, Telegu, Tamil, Punjabi, and many, many more. The languages represent an integral part of the intellectual patrimony of mankind - a wide-ranging cross-selection of the world's languages, and the cultural systems that they represent. New Jersey provides the field linguist with a unique opportunity to document languages, such as Ladino, Neo- Aramaic, Kalmyk, and Karachay, which may be inaccessible or even extinct in their homelands.

 

 

01:013:301:01: LANGUAGE AND GLOBALIZATION (Spring) TOPICS

This course examines "globalization" and its impact upon the world's languages from a critical perspective. It answers questions like: What is globalization? How has globalization changed the world around us economically, politically, socially, culturally, and above all, linguistically? What are the roles of the world's languages in  today's information- and market-driven world of the 21st century? What have been the positive and negative implications of globalization upon the world's languages?  The course is divided into three parts. PART 1 (first 3 weeks) introduces the students to the concept of "globalization," what it means and what dimensions it has. PART 2 (weeks 4-9) introduces the students to the "linguistic" dimension of globalization and the current debates/issues surrounding the global spread of the global language(s) and implications for other world's languages. PART (weeks 10-14) examines the linguistic implications of globalization in various contexts. The geographic focus of the course is as global as its central topic. Yet, special attention will be paid to selected cases in Asia, the European Union, African, Latin America and the US depending to students' research interests.

 

 013:304: INTRODUCTION TO TRANSLATION STUDIES (Spring)

 

This course will introduce students to the main themes and issues in contemporary Translation Studies. The course will begin with a brief survey of the role of translation in world history and the various ways in which translation has been theorized in the modern western tradition. Readings and discussion will then turn to current major topics in TS: the role or 'positionality' of the translator/interpreter, the relationship between translation and ideology/power (including the role that translation has played and continues to play in the history of empire, war and global media), the ethics of literary translation and practical interpreting and the impact of technologies like subtitling and machine translation.

 

 

 

013:305: AFRICAN, MIDDLE EASTERN & SOUTH ASIAN LANGUAGES IN PERIL

 

Introduction to the value of vocal languages and the threat posed by their disappearance, with a focus upon the endangered languages of Africa and Asia. This course will employ a multidisciplinary approach to address the impending disappearance of the world's linguistic and cultural patrimony, which is one of the greatest challenges facing mankind in the 21st century. The discussion of these general issues will be illustrated with nine case studies of endangered languages and the traditions that they represent: three from the Middle East, three from South Asia, and three from Africa.

 

013:242: CLASSICAL ARABIC I

 This course aims to introduce students to the language of the Qur'an and the classical texts, as well as the general history of the Arabic language before the modern period.  It is a full-year course. The first semester of the course will be dedicated to learning the grammar of Qur'anic and Classical Arabic (CA), with special reference to the ways in which it differs from Modern Standard Arabic (MSA); during the second semester, students will finish the grammar of the language and begin reading short texts in the original language. By the end of the first year, students will have achieved basic literacy in Classical Arabic and be able to read Qur'an and other classical works of Arabic literature in the original language. Students will also learn to use the standard dictionaries and grammars as references for further study.

 

 

 

 

 

013:243: CLASSICAL ARABIC II

This course aims to introduce students to the language of the Qur'an and the classical texts, as well as the general history of the Arabic language before the modern period.  It is a full-year  course. The first semester of the course will be dedicated to learning the grammar of Qur'anic and Classical Arabic (CA), with special reference to the ways in which it differs from Modern Standard Arabic (MSA); during the second semester, students will finish the grammar of the language and begin reading short texts in the original language. By the end of the first year, students will have achieved basic literacy in Classical Arabic and be able to read Qur'an and other classical works of Arabic literature in the original language. Students will also learn to use the standard dictionaries and grammars as references for further study.

 

 

 

013:409: INTRODUCTION TO THE SEMITIC LANGUAGES

 

This course aims to introduce students to the Semitic language family and the broader Afroasiatic language phylum. The grammar of the subject languages, which include Akkadian, Ethiopic, Ugaritic, Arabic, Hebrew, and Aramaic, among others, will be examined from both a synchronic and diachronic perspective. Subjects to be discussed include writing systems; the historical and comparative linguistics of the Semitic language family; classification of individual Semitic languages and proposed divisions/subgroupings within the family; historical reconstruction; and the phonology, morphology, and syntax of the various Semitic languages.